I went to Inaugural Event of the new Arthur C. Clarke Fellows Endowment of the International Space University. It was a wonderful event, which also included an inspiring tribute to Arthur C. Clarke and a showing of Orphans of Apollo and Q&A with Michael Potter the Director.

Orphans of Apollo is about Walt Anderson and Mircorp leasing of the Mir Space Station for commercial use and all the feathers it ruffled. I wondered about the name because real orphans of Apollo are not interested in anything in orbit except the Moon. The movie takes us on a rollercoaster ride through this attempt at space commercialization. I knew many of the people in the movie during that time. I remember being amused by what they were trying and amazed they got so far.

What I enjoyed most about the evening is seeing how much progress the space movement is making. George Whitesides attended reminding us that the presidential transition team included the Executive Director of NSS, the former Executive Director of the NSS Lori Garver and a former NSS Board Member Alan Ladwig. This week government officials seemed to be looking at Space Solar Power as something worthy of research funding. The movie Orphans of Apollo included a clip with Elon Musk and Space-X which are becoming serious contenders in the launch field. But the thing that was giving me the most hope was the event itself especially Michael Potter’s speech which would have done Rick Tumlinson proud.

Listening to Michael Potter speak at an event sponsored by the George Washington University Space Policy Institute is like seeing cars drive under the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin. As a teenager I used to live in Berlin, the Brandenburg Gate was one of the last things I saw in the city before I left. At the time there were groups of heavily armed soldiers about 20 yards apart, on each side of the Brandenburg gate, with guns pointed at each other. No one had passed through the gate in decades. Now there is a major street running under the gate when I first saw a picture of it as it is now I stared for 10 minutes trying to get my head around the concept. I feel like that now. The Space Policy Institute under Dr. Scott Pace is a fundamentally different place than it was a year ago.

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Contributors to the NSS Blog are unpaid volunteers. Unless specifically labeled an NSS position or press release, all blog posts represent the views of the author and not of NSS, even if written by an NSS officer.

2 thoughts on “Orphans Of Apollo at GWU”

  1. Can the dream of world peace thru solar powered satellites actually be coming true? Will space elevators made of colossal carbon tubes make solar powered satellites seven times cheaper? Is our space fairing civilization where “the rest of us” go into space just around the conrner? With Obama at the helm almost anything seems possible. But will it happen? Would it be asking too much for a little good news for a change?

    Reply
  2. Can the dream of world peace thru solar powered satellites actually be coming true? Will space elevators made of colossal carbon tubes make solar powered satellites seven times cheaper? Is our space fairing civilization where “the rest of us” go into space just around the corner? With Obama at the helm almost anything seems possible. But will it happen? Would it be asking too much for a little good news for a change?

    Reply

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